360 Environmental
  27th April 2009  

360 Newsletter

News

The week was, of course, dominated by the budget which included measures on Landfill Tax. We also saw the release of the first quarter packaging data which gives the first indication of the likely PRN supply for the year.
Elsewhere:

  • The Quinn Glass factory in Cheshire has been served with papers to cease production activities.
  • WRAP have started a project into the potential for using recycled polyprop for food grade uses.
  • The EA have revealed a large scale investigation into illegal WEEE exports.
  • The HSE have launched a new website for waste and recycling activities.

News items from 360 website

Treasury publishes Landfill Tax overhaul 26 APRIL 2009
HMRC has published a consultation on proposed changes to the Landfill Tax system that is designed to move some waste from inert to standard rate tax and to close a recent loophole that has emerged on waste used for engineering purposes on sites

Qtr 1 packaging data published 23 APRIL 2009
The reprocessor and exporter data for the first quarter data has been published by the Environment Agency showing a generally encouraging perfomance other than in steel.
 
Landfill Tax escalator to continue from 2010 22 APRIL 2009
In his budget speech this afternoon, the Chancellor has stated that the landfill tax escalator of £8/tonne per year will continue until 2013, pushing the tax to £72/tonne from 1 April in that year.

Humour

English signs in foreign coutries

In a Tokyo Hotel: Is forbidden to steal hotel towels please. If you are not a person to do such thing is please not to read notis.
In a Bucharest hotel lobby: The lift is being fixed for the next day. During that time we regret that you will be unbearable.
In a Leipzig elevator: Do not enter the lift backwards, and only when lit up.
In a Belgrade hotel elevator: To move the cabin, push button for wishing floor. If the cabin should enter more persons, each one should press a number of wishing floor. Driving is then going alphabetically by national order.
In a Paris hotel elevator: Please leave your values at the front desk.
In a hotel in Athens: Visitors are expected to complain at the office between the hours of 9 and 11 A.M. daily.
In a Yugoslavian hotel: The flattening of underwear with pleasure is the job of the chambermaid.
In a Japanese hotel: You are invited to take advantage of the chambermaid.
In the lobby of a Moscow hotel across from a Russian Orthodox monastery: You are welcome to visit the cemetery where famous Russian and Soviet composers, artists, and writers are buried daily except Thursday.
In an Austrian hotel catering to skiers: Not to perambulate the corridors in the hours of repose in the boots of ascension.
In a Bangkok temple: It is forbidden to enter a woman even a foreigner if dressed as a man.
In a Tokyo bar: Special cocktails for the ladies with nuts.

If you are likely to be affected by the new Batteries Regulations - retailers, producers, local authorities - you may be interested in our Workshop on 20 May in the Midlands.